The Quest for Beautiful Questions in Outer and Inner Space

Oct 04 2015 Published by neilgains under book review

In The Martian, the stranded astronaut Mark Watney has to use his wits and scientific knowledge to overcome hostile landscapes and environment, tragic accidents and the loneliness of being the only man left on Mars. The story focuses on his ingenuity in solving all the problems that he comes up against. And why is Mark Watney so good at solving all the problems that confront him? He is also very good at asking the right questions. Read more »

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How to CHIME with System 1

Sep 07 2015 Published by neilgains under behavioural economics

Daniel Kahneman’s version of the division of the brain is gradually replacing the models, although it shares much in common with the older view of the “triune” brain. In the triune model there area three parts, the reptilian brain (home of the basic functions like homeostasis, breathing, feeding, sex), the mammalian brain (home of the emotions) and the neocortex (home of memory, higher level sensory processing and self-reflection and rational thinking).Daniel Kahneman’s System 1 is closest to a combination of reptilian and mammalian brains (survival and emotion) although it also incorporates some higher level sensory processing too. Read more »

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Bah Humbug! What is advertising really about?

Aug 18 2015 Published by neilgains under book review

In The Anatomy of HumbugT, Paul Feldwick provides a clear and interesting overview of the history of advertising and the different theories of how and why advertising works (and doesn’t), from the “Salesmanship” theory of advertising of the early years of the industry (mostly associated with more rational models of decision making) to the “Seduction” theory of the early motivational researchers and more lately of neuromarketing, which inform the central discussion of this fascinating book.

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What’s in a Metaphor? Using images to decode culture

Jul 21 2015 Published by neilgains under semiotics

TapestryWorks recently conducted some fascinating research into the meaning of beauty for Muslim women in Indonesia and Malaysia.  The self-funded project looked at the key emotional goals relating to beauty, using our StoryWorks framework and Visual Think Cards, perceptions of local female celebrities in relation to beauty, and an emotional and cultural analysis of how brands are talking about beauty in both markets.

We will be sharing the results with clients and publishing some of the key highlights soon, but one of the major findings is that many local brands are far ahead of global brands in catching the local zeitgeist and communicating messages that resonate with local cultural norms.

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Framing Prices for SNAPP Decisions

Jun 22 2015 Published by neilgains under behavioural economics

In my last post on the psychology of money, I looked at pricing through the lens of the SNAPP behaviour framework. I left out many examples due to time and space, especially under the theme of PATTERNS, where there are many well known examples of Framing and Priming of behaviour. In this article I will focus on some more examples of the importance of PATTERNS in human decision-making, especially in how the brain interprets pricing and value. Read more »

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Pricing in a SNAPP: The psychology of money

Jun 15 2015 Published by neilgains under behavioural economics

“Price is what you pay. Value is what you get.”  - Warren Buffett

Price is definitely not the same as value, although classical economics continues to assume it is. In their rational models, economists (and many researchers) believe that humans are calculating machines summing up the costs and benefits of a decision with perfect information and reaching a rational conclusion (so-called Homo Economicus). The reality is quite different, in that many of our decisions are habitual (automated) and those that aren’t are most often made by using simple heuristics (mental rules of thumb) as proxies for more effortful analysis of what to do. Read more »

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Market Research Buyers and SNAPP Decisions

Jun 08 2015 Published by neilgains under behavioural economics

Over the last year, TapestryWorks has been helping many clients decode the complexity of human behavior to optimise marketing plans, brainstorm behavioral promotional campaigns, audit in-store execution and understand shopper behavior. We’ve worked across many different categories and one of the most common questions is whether “System 1” (implicit) decision-making applies to business in the same way as it applies to consumers. My answer is that it does, because ultimately it’s always about people. That is, B2C and B2B are both P2P.

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Building Brand Identity Beats Advertising Hands Down

Jun 01 2015 Published by neilgains under branding

TapestryWorks have always argued for and emphasised the importance of distinctive brand identity in building successful brands. It makes complete sense in terms of the brain science and the importance of pattern recognition and the building of mental associations linked to emotional needs and context. And now the data is in! Read more »

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Designing Presentations in a SNAPP

May 26 2015 Published by neilgains under storytelling

In 100 Things Every Presenter Needs To Know About People, Susan Weinschenk outlines many behavioural triggers and barriers in the context of successful presentations, covering how people think and learn, how to get attention, how to motivate, how people listen and see, how they react to the environment, how they react emotionally, and how they decide to take action. The book is a useful summary of many of the behavioural quirks we have written about here. Most especially, the different behaviours that the author highlights fall into the five themes outlined in TapestryWorks’ SNAPP thinking framework which we find a useful way to simplify human behaviour and decision-making into broad themes. Read more »

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Emotions - A body of evidence

May 25 2015 Published by neilgains under emotion

Emotional mapping is a core part of TapestryWorks work, and we have often argued that emotions are much more physical and non-conscious than cognitive (see our white paper here). So I was fascinated to find a paper from 2013 in which the authors reported several studies inn which they had asked people to “map” bodily sensations though a topographical self-report method. The results are fascinating and show that different emotions produce sensations in different parts of the body. They also show evidence that in the majority of cases these sensations and states are culturally universal. Read more »

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