Archive for the 'brand essense' Category

Is Singapore Airlines a Caregiver or a Magician? (The Importance of Brand esSense #7)

Mar 22 2018 Published by under brand essense

Is it just me or does anyone else think that Singapore Airlines latest advertising doesn’t “feel” right? While it’s beautifully shot, it feels more like a trailer for a Disney fairy tale than a commercial for air travel (you can watch the ad here). Brand esSense is optimised when there is consistency across all touch points and senses, and in this commercial, titled “Making every journey personal” I don’t think there is any consistency.

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What can brands learn from post-truth politics?

Feb 26 2018 Published by under brand essense

In Post Truth, Matthew d’Ancona lays out the ways in which modern politics, and life, show the increasing importance of emotional resonance over the inconvenient details of facts and realities.  After recent events around the world, no one should doubt that emotional resonance has the power to beat facts and arguments in the realm of politics, but are there lessons for businesses and brands? Read more »

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Positive, Sincere and Natural: Indonesia Beauty Buying Patterns

Nov 09 2017 Published by under brand essense

There are several myths I have heard about Indonesian beauty, mostly from outside Indonesia (and often from outside Asia). The first myth is that Indonesia is not an important market for beauty products, and that women are less engaged with beauty than in other countries. The second myth is that confidence is a key goal of female beauty, a myth that is perpetrated around the world and not just in Indonesia. And the third myth is that creating a successful beauty brand in Indonesia is all about being halal. Read more »

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Why visual research approaches are more insightful than words

Oct 31 2017 Published by under brand essense

The standard model of market research has relied on language as the main medium for understanding behaviour for more than 100 years. Recent discoveries in psychology and behavioural economics suggest that behaviour is driven more by emotions than reason, so is language still the best medium for communication in marketing and research?

TapestryWorks recently undertook research-on-research to understand the impact of different stimuli, verbal and visual, on human responses to the same set questions (read more here). Our focus was on the motivations underlying women’s perceptions of beauty, and we ran the same study across four different countries: Australia, Indonesia, Thailand and the UK. Read more »

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Cultural Insights Help Marketers Connect Universal Truths to Local Truths

Aug 21 2017 Published by under brand essense

Little by little the past few years have seen a weakening of the dominance of multinational brands in Asia, as local players win consumer’s hearts with greater understanding of local culture and its importance in consumer decision-making.

For example, beauty is big business in Asia, but in many countries local brands are the most popular with the highest penetration and market share, with international brands increasingly struggling to compete. In Indonesia, local brand Wardah has come from nowhere to take around one-third of the cosmetics market. It’s secret? Understanding the values of Indonesian women (and halal certification, something that has now been legislated to come into effect in the coming years). Read more »

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From Morning Lift To Nighttime Gift: Jakarta beauty routines

Jun 30 2017 Published by under brand essense

Two years ago, TapestryWorks collaborated with ABN Impact Indonesia to explore beauty goals among Indonesian women, and exactly two years’ later we went back to their Jakarta Beauty insight community to learn more.

In our earlier study, we learnt about a range of motivations that are important to Jakarta women and the beauty that they desire, including Confidence, Knowledge, Care, Belonging, Love, Fun and the desire to be (a little) Unique. In our latest study, we decided to look more deeply into these different motivations to understand how they relate to different aspects of women’s daily lives. Read more »

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The esSense of a new insurance brand? (The Importance of Brand esSense #6)

Feb 14 2017 Published by under brand essense

Walking through Singapore yesterday, I noticed for the first time the eTiQa insurance brand, owned by Maybank. Perhaps I should have noticed the brand before, but I was struck by the colours and naming of the brand which struck an immediate resonance for the category.

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Is Donald Trump a branding guru that market research should follow?

Feb 03 2017 Published by under brand essense

Perhaps the most important thing that Donald Trump has shown us all is the importance of being different and distinctive from your competitors. In a recent article on hbr.org, Roger Martin argues that Trump didn’t win because of a bad Clinton strategy, celebrity obsession or Russian hackers (although they may have contributed). Donald Trump won because people wanted change and he “positioned” his brand as the change and anti-establishment candidate. Read more »

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The Beauty of Believing in Brand Values

Nov 28 2016 Published by under brand essense

Reading Generation M recently (review here) made me think long and hard about the relationship between religious or spiritual beliefs and brand values. TapestryWorks’ research on Asian beauty has highlighted the gap between international brands and the aspirations of many Asian women. This gap is nowhere clearer than Indonesia, where many local brands “feel” much more in tune with local culture, a culture which is very strongly informed by Muslim values. Read more »

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A Gap in the Toblerone Brand (The Importance of Brand esSense #5)

Nov 10 2016 Published by under brand essense

Why, oh why, oh why? Why would any brand manager take the most unique, distinctive and well known asset of a brand and change it?

Well Mondelez know better and have widened the spaces between the well known chunks of a Toblerone chocolate bar in order to save money (perhaps inspired by Brexit and rising ingredient costs). You can see the original and “gappy” versions of the product above.

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