Is Boredom a good thing?

Jul 28 2017 Published by neilgains under emotion

Even though the modern world is full of constant demands on our attention and an ever-increasing choice of on-demand food and drink, media and experiences, boredom is still a common and arguably important part of our lives. In one U.K. survey, the average person claimed to suffer from boredom for 6 hours per week, which would add up to 2 or more years of an average lifespan. Read more »

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Learning the Psychology of Online Persuasion

Jun 22 2017 Published by neilgains under book review

Webs of Influence is one of the most useful books on psychology you will ever pick up. It’s easy to use format covers swathes of research into the psychology of human behavior and what it means for designing marketing programs and websites that engage with people. The second edition has just been published with more useful content updated to reflect this fast-changing field. Read more »

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Picturing Emotions in Research

Jun 07 2016 Published by neilgains under emotion

TapestryWorks has been using Visual Think Cards® for several years now to capture human goals and the emotions and contexts that are associated with them. For most branding applications, these work very well to elicit the balance of positive and negative sentiment associated with a category, brand or experience.

However, sometimes we need to dig deeper into emotions, especially when the topic is more serious and with darker feelings. On these occasions, we have often used a model of human emotions based on evolutionary biology and psychology (read more here and here about Robert Plutchik’s wheel of emotions).

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Weaving Sense, Symbol and Story into Brands

Feb 11 2016 Published by neilgains under brand essense

The central argument of Brand esSense is that brands can leverage multiple touch points to enhance their brand identity by sending consistent messages across the stories they tell, the symbolism that they use and the way that they engage the different senses in customer experience of interacting with the brand. Building consistency and linkage across brand stories, symbols and sensory experience enables brands to build stronger assets that increase the mental and physical availability (i.e., visibility) that drive brand growth (read more on this here).

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Are You Available? (Part 2)

Feb 10 2016 Published by neilgains under consumer psychology

In How Brands Grow Part 2, Jenni Romaniuk and Byron Sharp continue the arguments of the original book (read a review here) with much more evidence and detail on a range of specific topics including emerging markets, service categories and luxury brands.

The evidence they present is clear, consistent and comprehensively nails many of the marketing myths that they sought to challenge in the first book. And specifically they seek to challenge the “but my category is different” argument with data from a range of categories and markets including China and Indonesia that will be of interest to readers of this blog. Read more »

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Mind and Magic

Dec 08 2015 Published by neilgains under book review

In Sleights of Mind, the authors cannily explain some of the latest science of the brain though examples of magic tricks, illusions and mind games that demonstrate the fallibilities of the human mind and the way in which magicians often have greater insight into the innermost workings of our brain than most neuroscientists.

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The Spectre of Blending Signs

Nov 09 2015 Published by neilgains under semiotics

I really enjoyed Spectre, the latest Bond outing. In particular, the film is full of references to other (Bond) movies. Apart from the fact that Spectre weaves together strands from all three of Daniel Craig’s previous outings, I noticed quiet specific references to several earlier Bond films, including From Russia With Love, You Only Live Twice, On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (via Inception) and The Spy Who Loved Me. And those are only the ones that I remember (I wasn’t taking notes in the cinema).

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The Quest for Beautiful Questions in Outer and Inner Space

Oct 04 2015 Published by neilgains under book review

In The Martian, the stranded astronaut Mark Watney has to use his wits and scientific knowledge to overcome hostile landscapes and environment, tragic accidents and the loneliness of being the only man left on Mars. The story focuses on his ingenuity in solving all the problems that he comes up against. And why is Mark Watney so good at solving all the problems that confront him? He is also very good at asking the right questions. Read more »

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Bah Humbug! What is advertising really about?

Aug 18 2015 Published by neilgains under book review

In The Anatomy of HumbugT, Paul Feldwick provides a clear and interesting overview of the history of advertising and the different theories of how and why advertising works (and doesn’t), from the “Salesmanship” theory of advertising of the early years of the industry (mostly associated with more rational models of decision making) to the “Seduction” theory of the early motivational researchers and more lately of neuromarketing, which inform the central discussion of this fascinating book.

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What’s in a Metaphor? Using images to decode culture

Jul 21 2015 Published by neilgains under semiotics

TapestryWorks recently conducted some fascinating research into the meaning of beauty for Muslim women in Indonesia and Malaysia.  The self-funded project looked at the key emotional goals relating to beauty, using our StoryWorks framework and Visual Think Cards, perceptions of local female celebrities in relation to beauty, and an emotional and cultural analysis of how brands are talking about beauty in both markets.

We will be sharing the results with clients and publishing some of the key highlights soon, but one of the major findings is that many local brands are far ahead of global brands in catching the local zeitgeist and communicating messages that resonate with local cultural norms.

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